Handbuilding Video: How to Make Strong Appendages on Coil Built Forms

 

Joyce Michaud builds an appendage off of a coil-built form.

A few weeks ago, I posted a clip from Joyce Michaud's new DVD Hand Thrown: East Asian Wedged Coil Technique. In the clip, Joyce gave a great introduction to this technique, which combines coiling with potter’s wheel concepts. This combination makes for coil-built pieces that are very strong structurally.

 

Today I decided to share with you another tasty morsel from the DVD. Joyce takes the instruction further by explaining how these same principles can be used to make very strong appendages on pieces. - Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

 

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This clip was excerpted from Hand Thrown: East Asian Wedged Coil, which is available in the Ceramic Arts Daily Bookstore.

Comments
  • Wow now that’s a technique I’ve not seen before, thanks.

    Clara Emma

  • Talk about long winded! OK, the technique is fine but I nearly fell asleep half way through.

  • Thanks for sharing how you talk to your clay and how it responds.

  • An interesting technique which may have advantages for a stronger wall. I presume the stronger wall is in the wet to dryed state. But I do not see the added advantage of stressing the curve element of the expanded outward wall, (which has thinned the wall and stressed the clay platelet alignment) and rebuilding it for strength, verses cutting, luting, and adding for re-enforcent of the wall section for the appendage. When moist clay is compressed the secret to dry strength of the wall is in the chemical bonding of the similar clay particles. If the clay is not joined together properly no matter the technique, a crack will appear where ever stress in the clay wall has occured. The fired strength is in the mullite structure createdin the melted alumina-silica compontents of the clay. I really don’t see the mystic of this stronger wall.

  • Wow, how to take 30 seconds of information and expand it to 9 minutes. Some of the terminology might confuse a beginner. I’m not sure that the technique demonstrated will necessarily result in a stronger attachment.

  • Nice one Sharon I thought the same. Its a great technique but I nearly fell asleep to.

  • não consegui entender o sentido de tudo isso para algo tão simples????

  • Sure looks like a LOT more time than just starting with a coil and working it in quickly with a tool.

  • WELL FOR THE ‘SLOW’ PEOPLE I AM SORRY FOR YOU. YES THE INSTRUCTION MAY HAVE BEEN THOROUGH AND REPETITIVE SO WHAT? DID YOU OR SLAB YOUR FIRST POT OR ADD AN APPENDAGE IN 5 SECONDS? I THOUGHT IT WAS FANTASTIC AND I UNDERSTOOD HOW THE TECHNIQUE MAINTAINED AND ENHANCED THE INTEGRATED BODIES. WELL DONE JOYCE 10 POINTS.

  • Well ditto, Paul. Thanx Joyce for continuation of lesson 1 on “Ancient
    Asian” technique of handbuilding which isn’t for everyone. This takes TIME. My students liked the project butdid complain about the “time”. This appraoch builds a strong pot and paddling was the savior. The “no Joint-seam” may ease the stress of the addition by making you spend “time”on it.

  • What a great technique! I really like to coil and this idea is great for adding appendages for the creation of figure characters as well:)

  • I like the clean line in the finished product, but for crying out loud, there is a way to keep people awake, show it and not drag it on….I can sleep tonite for sure!!

  • I am in with Paul and Mary Jo. Great demo and explanation!

  • Ditto.it just might make sense to a newbee,slow and very informative!

  • There’s always room for more information. Just seeing a different way of doing this is important information what would not translate with words alone. Thank you for the video. It was well worth watching.

  • I have been potting for 10 yrs. My group have become stuck and unadventurous. I have learnt so much since I found you and enjoy all that I see. Thank you for restoring my love of clay.

  • me gustaria saber como copiar alguno de los videos y poder compartirlo con mis alumnos,muchas gracias.

  • What a wide response to another way of adding appendages. It is always difficult to take a clip out of context. The video is truly an instructional video. Frustration occurs in the learning process when you find that a critical bit of information was left out. This section may seem long, but the goal is to give the detail in order to allow viewers to build skills.
    The technique may be slow in the beginning, but as skills improve watch out. I have seen high school classes fill the room to overflowing with great pots made with East Asian Coil.
    My goal as a teacher is to provide depth and breadth to enhance learning. Research and experience develop knowledge and skill. Our goal as potters is to find success and satisfaction in the work we produce as we develop our own creative voice.

  • I think if you watch this clip as an experienced potter who already knows how to make coiled pots or appendages, it may have been long or detailed. However, to someone who doesn’t have as much experience or understand the technique it was really wonderful to finally hear someone actually explain something. Not just show it quickly in a few, deft moves but teach it with words and hands. I was able to replicate it just from watching the clip on my second try. The last time I made a coil pot was in fourth grade and I’m not telling you when that was! My skills are developing and I hunger for explanations to accompany the demonstrations. Many times they are missing. Joyce, you do a great job. Perhaps I will make it to Maryland some day.

  • wow very wonderful and creative…………thanks

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