Using Underglazes as Stains to Bring Out Texture

Stains accentuate texture and will add some punch to your pots!

Underglazes as Stains

Screen printing on ceramic work can produce some pretty exciting surfaces. But combining screen printing with other surface techniques, like stamping and staining, can take it a step further.

Jason Bige Burnett masterfully combines screen printing with other techniques in his work. In today’s post, an excerpt from his video, The Graphic Pot, Jason explains how he uses underglazes as stains, which gather in his stamped textures and add depth to his screen printed patterns. What’s great about using underglazes for this is that the color palette is practically limitless! Enjoy!- Jennifer Poellot Harnetty, editor.


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This clip was excerpted from The Graphic Pot: Handbuilding & Surface Techniques, which is available in the Ceramic Arts Network Shop!


To learn more about Jason Bige Burnett or to see more images of his work, please visit his website, www.jasonbigeburnett.com.


More Underglaze Decoration Techniques to Try!

by Erin Furimsky

Underglaze Definition: Underglazes, or engobes, are colored slips formulated to have low drying shrinkage, allowing application to leather hard, bone-dry, or bisque-fired surfaces before glazing.

Underglazes as StainsUnderglaze is such a wonderful and versatile material to have in the ceramic studio. From the sgraffito technique to an underglaze watercolor painting technique, to using stencils on pottery to mask off certain areas or patterns (as Erin did on the cup she was decorating in this video), the sky is the limit for underglaze decoration. And what’s great about underglazes is that they can be used on greenware or bisqueware. If you have any interest in making your own underglaze from scratch, check out this post in the archives on how to make underglaze!

The image shown here shows the fired result of this technique with a clear glaze coat over the top.

To learn more about Erin Furimsky or see images of her work, please visit www.erinfurimsky.com.

**First published in 2014.
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