How Low Can You Go? Ten Tried and True Low Fire Glaze Recipes Available for Download!

There are loads of possibilities for great surfaces in the low fire temperature range, from textured to matt, or majolica to glossy transparent glazes.  Today, I am posting a sample recipe from this collection — a dry lithium glaze with a great texture  – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

HK Dry Lithium Base 1 Glaze Recipe
Cone 010 Oxidation
Glaze Material
Percentage
Lithium Carbonate 27.55%
Bentonite 3.06
6 Tile Kaolin 15.31
Silica/Flint (Vansil W-20) 54.08
Total 100%
 
For Salmon Pink:
Manganese Dioxide 5.00%
For Burnt Salmon Red:
Black Copper Oxide 3.50%
Manganese Dioxide 3.00%
For Granite Gray:
Nickel Oxide 5.00%
For Oyster Shell White:
Black Iron Oxide 3.00%
Vanadium Stain 1.00%
For Limestone Green:
Black Copper Oxide 3.00%
Rutile 4.50%

* Caution should be exercised when working with and around ceramic raw materials. Wear a respirator when working with the dry materials, make sure your kiln is well ventilated, and that your workspace is separate from your kiln area.

 

These dry lithium glazes are applied to earthenware and fired up to cone 04. To retain application texture and dry surface quality, fire only to cone 010. Multiple firings may be necessary for color intensity and depth. Shivering may occur if the glaze firing is prolonged. The recommended firing schedule is to turn up the kiln (electric) one third every two hours, so that the kiln is on high in four hours.

 

 

Comments
  • Just wanted to take a minute and thank everyone at Daily. I am always excited when I open your emails. This site has educated me on every aspect of the ceramic art world. I am kept up to date on everything that’s happening in the clay community just by coming here. I have learned so much from all of the free tips and recipes that I almost feel guilty printing them out!
    So, thank you! I can’t wait to try these low fire glazes…
    Heather Woodson

  • Like Heather, I find your daily posts invaluable.I am reminded of the little saying that “When someone sells something one person gains the item (be it knowledge or physical work)and loses the money. The seller loses the work and gains the money. When two students share knowledge neither loses anything but both gain.”
    I have been helped immensely by your postings and have been able to help fellow student potters with that knowledge here in very southern end of New Zealand where very few serious potters work.Your influence spreads! Jill Nicholls

  • Thank you for coming to my assistance. Lost my lithium glaze recipe, needed urgently, so will try this and let you know how it comes out. Look forward to future e-mails.
    Thanks again -Muriel Burton

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