How to Trim Pottery with A Chum

What’s the Difference Between a Pottery Chum and Pottery Chuck?

Trim Pottery with A Chum

If you’ve ever wanted to trim a pot from the top to the bottom, but the lugs attaching the pot to the wheel got in the way, today’s post is for you! In this video clip, an excerpt from his new video Perfecting Mugs & Bowls on the Wheel, Sam Scott demonstrates how to trim pottery with a chum. This technique is great because you can really refine the entire surface of a piece without the hassle of those pesky clay lugs. And it can also speed up the process too! – Jennifer Poellot Harnetty, editor.


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This clip was excerpted from Perfecting Mugs & Bowls on the Wheel with Sam Scott, which is available in the Ceramic Arts Network Shop. CLAYflicks subscribers can watch the entire video by clicking here. Not a CLAYflicks subscriber (yet!)? Click here to view an excerpt.

What’s the Difference Between a Pottery Chum and Pottery Chuck?

A pottery chum is a clay support that is a solid mound of clay shaped like a cone. Chums are made for cups and mugs that can fit over the top of the chum. Pottery chucks are hour-glass-shaped cylinders and are for pots with narrow necks that can’t be trimmed directly on the wheel because they would tip over. Narrow-necked pots can simply be placed upside down with their shoulders resting on the top of the chuck.

Comments
  • Claire O.

    Please explain why the need to trim. Would it have be more efficient to throw it to the desired thickness with right angle at the floor?

    • Sam S.

      Hi Claire, good question. When you are beginning you will inevitably need to trim the lower region of a pot. When you master throwing, if you want a foot, you will need to trim. When I throw off the hump I trim for three reasons; to eliminate the excess left when gauging where to cut it off, to create a concavity at the bottom, and to fine tune and ensure the surface is perfectly smooth for the decorating methods I employ when glazing.

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