Exposure: April 2016

“Archie Bray Foundation 2015 Resident and Visiting Artists,”

at Belger Crane Yard Studios (www.redstarstudios.org) in Kansas City, Missouri, March 6–May 21.

1 Adam Ledford’s Helena and Counter Craft (detail), 12 in. (30 cm) in height, terra cotta, 2015. 2 Heesoo Lee’s poppy bowl, 21 in. (53 cm) in diameter, porcelain, underglaze, 2015. Photo: Adam Field. 3 Robert Brady’s Drop, 16 in. (41 cm) in height, ceramic, glaze, 2014. 4 Rebekah Myers and Tim Berg’s Site Unseen, Figure 3, 13 in. (33 cm) in length, porcelain, earthenware, glaze, gold luster, ash wood, urethane painted MDF, 2014. Photo: Susan Einstein. 5 Lauren Smith’s flower vase, 8 in. (20 cm) in height, porcelain, multiple sprayed glazes, oxidation fired to cone 10, 2016. 6 Gunyoung Kim’s Shareable, 17½ in. (44 cm) in height, white earthenware, terra sigillata, underglaze, glaze, gold luster, 2015. 7 Joe Bova’s Monkey Rhyton, 5 in. (13 cm) in height, ceramic, 2015. Photo: Charlie Cummings. 8 Bill Wilkey’s Bottle Variants, 62 in. (157 cm), soda-fired porcelain, 2015.

 

“Seeing: Rafael Pérez,”

at Contemporary Ceramics Centre (www.cpaceramics.com) in London, England, April 7–May 7.


Ex_RafaelPerez_RP_006_RT

1 Rafael Pérez’ sculpture, ceramic.

 

“Ruth King: Solo Exhibition,”

at Contemporary Ceramics Centre (www.cpaceramics.com) in London, England, May 12–June 4.


Ex_RuthKing_RuthKing2

Ruth King’s soft oblong vessel, 10½ in. (27 cm) in height, ceramic.

 

“Artaxis + Northern Clay Center Exhibition,”

at Emily Galusha Gallery, Northern Clay Center (www.northernclaycenter.org), in Minneapolis, Minnesota, through April 24.

1 Erica Iman Paternoster Series I, 17 in. (43 cm) in length, porcelain, glaze, wire, 2012. 2 J.J. McCracken’s Thirst and the Martyr, endurance performance, soundscape, 2007. Photo: Margaret Boozer. Courtesy of Connersmit. 3 Christina West’s Core #2, 16½ in. (42 cm) in height, pigmented hydrocal, 2014. 

 

 “Ceramic Art London”

at Central St. Martins, (http://www.ceramics.org.uk/index.php) in London, England,
April 8–10, 2016.

 

1 Ikuko Iwamoto’s Pits IV (Framed Sculpture), 24 in. (61 cm) in height, porcelain, metal wires, wood, glass. Courtesy of Ceramic Art London. 2 Chris Keenan’s bowls, 5½ in. (14 cm) in diameter, Limoges porcelain. Courtesy of Ceramic Art London. 3 Sophie Cook’s Matt Yellow Teardrop and Bottle, ceramic. Courtesy of Ceramic Art London. 4 Daniel Smith’s painted bowls, to 6 in. (15 cm) in diameter. Courtesy of Ceramic Art London. 5 Thomas Bohle’s vessel, 9 in. (24 cm) in diameter, ceramic, barium glaze. Courtesy of Ceramic Art London.

 

“RE—Reanimate, Repair, Mend and Meld,”

at Ferrin Contemporary (http://ferrincontemporary.com), in North Adams, Massachusetts, through April 17, 2016.

 

1 Stephen Bowers’ Camouflage plate, 12 in. (30 cm) in earthenware, underglaze, clear glaze, on-glaze burnished gold luster, enamel, 2016. 2 Caroline Slotte’s plate (Going Blank Again Series), 20½ in. (52 cm) in diameter, reworked second-hand ceramics, 2010. 3 Bouke de Vries’ The Repair II, 14 in. (36 cm) in length, 18th-century Chinese porcelain tureen stand, tureen cover, mixed media, 2014. 4 Paul Scott’s Scott’s Cumbrian Blue(s), Fukushima No: 5, 18¾ in. (48 cm) in diameter, c. 1965 Japanese Willow platter, glaze, decal, brass pins, gold leaf, tile cement, epoxy resin, 2015.

 

 

 

“Word and Object,”

at Gulf Coast Second Annual Ceramics Symposium (www.gulfcoast.edu), in Panama City, Florida, April 15–17, 2016.


Ex_GulfCoast_CaroleEpp

Carole Epp’s Guilt Trip, 11 in. (28 cm) in height, ceramic, underglazes, oxidation fired to cone 6.

Subscriber Extras: Images

“Transitions 2015 to 2016,”

at Eutectic Gallery (www.eutecticgallery.com) in Portland, Oregon, through January 23, 2016.

Hiroshi OgawaIchirin Zashi #2HO1059$800.00

Paige Wright’s Self Portrait with as Dracula, stoneware, glaze. Hiroshi Ogawa’s vessel, ceramic, anagama fired in a earthen kiln.

“Jürgen Partenheimer: Calliope,”

at Musée Ariana (www.ariana-geneve.ch) in Geneva, Switzerland, through March 20, 2016

Jürgen Partenheimer’s Kalliope III#4, 18 in. (46 cm) in height, porcelain, painted polychrome enamels, 2011. Collection of Porzellanmanufaktur Nymphenburg, Münich Copyright: Jürgen Partenheimer et VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn Courtesy: Häusler Contemporary München/ Zürich.

Jürgen Partenheimer’s Kalliope II#5, 11¾ in. (30 cm) in height, porcelain, painted polychrome enamels, 2011. Collection of Porzellanmanufaktur Nymphenburg, Münich Copyright: Jürgen Partenheimer et VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn Courtesy: Häusler Contemporary München/ Zürich.

Jürgen Partenheimer’s Kalliope II#2, 11¾ in. (30 cm) in height, porcelain, painted polychrome enamels, 2011. Collection of Porzellanmanufaktur Nymphenburg, Münich Copyright: Jürgen Partenheimer et VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn Courtesy: Häusler Contemporary München/ Zürich.

“Ancient and Modern: Ceramics by Randy Johnston,”

at Pucker Gallery (www.puckergallery.com), in Boston, Massachusetts, December 5, 2015–January 10, 2016.

 

1 Randy Johnston’s Large Platter, up to 21¼ in. (54 cm) in diameter, inlaid rope pattern, black trailing, stoneware. Photo: Peter Lee. 2 Randy Johnston’s Square Vase, up to 17 in. (43 cm) in height, shino glaze, iron slip, brushwork, stoneware. Photo: Peter Lee. 3 Randy Johnston’s Yunomi, up to 3¾ in. (10 cm) in height, nuka glaze, iron brushwork, stoneware. Photo: Peter Lee.

 

 

“Teaching the Tradition,”

at Lillstreet Art Center (www.lillstreetgallery.com) in Chicago, Illinois, January 15–February 21, 2016.

1 David East’s Myth Functioning as a Memory, 15½ in. (39 cm) in height, ceramic, 2014. 2 Jeff Oestreich’s Vase, 10 in. (25 cm) in height, ceramic, soda fired, 2015.

 

 

“Yoshida Yoshihiko: Works and His Collections,”

at Museum of Modern Ceramic Art, Gifu (www.cpm-gifu.jp), in Gifu, Japan, until February 14, 2016.

 

1 Yoshida Yoshihiko’s teabowl, 5¼ in. (13 cm) in diameter, Setoguro-inspired pottery, 1998. Photo: Kodera Katsuhiko. 2Yoshida Yoshihiko’s Polyhedron, 15¾ in. (41 cm) in height, ceramic, 1992. Photo: Kodera Katsuhiko.
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